Lazy Weekend Canoe 3D at Last

This week Eliza and Abby are competing in the clogging national championships at Lagoon.  Brooklyn is competing next week, but she has classes that are competing this week.  This means that most of my family is out of town this weekend.

I assumed that I would spend most of the day just watching Sam, but he’s slept enough that I have made some progress.  In fact, the canoe has, at long last, gone 3D. Continue reading “Lazy Weekend Canoe 3D at Last”

Dying To Get Wet

My first launch last year was in March, and I am really ready to get back out on the water.  Of course, part of the problem is that I haven’t had enough time to get my boat projects finished.  I still haven’t finished the Lazy Weekend Canoe and the leeboard to my PDR is in pieces.  Not to mention the fact that everything could use a bit of sanding and paint.

I was hoping to have a new, much larger sailboat ready for this season, but right now I would settle for one boat that was actually ready to get in the water.

Scarf Joints

I’ve been really worried about joining pieces of wood with the Lazy Weekend canoe. I have already written, not one, but two articles on joining plywood. I was even more concerned about joining long pieces of lumber.

Yes, I realize that seems unlikely, but it is still true.

I had hoped to get around needing scarf lumber for this build. After all, the longest piece that I needed was 16 feet, and my local Lowes has plenty of lumber that is as long as that. Unfortunately, one of my gunnels had a tight knot in it. It didn’t take hardly any pressure at all for the gunnel to break. Continue reading “Scarf Joints”

Butt Joints (in Plywood)

One of the major reasons that I built a Puddle Duck Racer, and then a Mouse Boat was that both of these boats are under 8 feet long. That meant that I could easily purchase lumber that was as long or longer than the length of the boat. I did this because I assumed that joining pieces of plywood or timber was difficult.

It certainly seemed difficult. Most books on boat building spend a significant amount of text on the subject, and the Internet is full of jigs and strategies for scarfing lumber and plywood. Pre-built kits get around the need for scarfing plywood with fancy cutouts that allow the pieces to fit together like puzzle pieces. A bit of fiberglass and resin over the top and the joint becomes the strongest part of the sheet. Of course, I knew right away that this sort of precision was right out for me. Not to mention the fact that I want to steer clear of epoxy so that I feel more comfortable getting kids involved. Continue reading “Butt Joints (in Plywood)”

Lazy Weekend Chine Logs

Another weekend, a bit more progress on the Lazy Weekend Canoe.

I didn’t have a lot of time, but I did manage to put together just enough time to put the chine logs on. Bending the chines did reveal that one of the pieces of lumber that I hoped to use as a chine log had a big knot it in near the end. I broke the piece testing it. There is no way that it would have bent to the shape that I needed. That means that I am going to need to scarf some lumber. I am currently drawing up a jig in Librecad that should allow me to easily cut the scarfs that I need. We will see how that goes. Continue reading “Lazy Weekend Chine Logs”

Edge Joining Plywood

This weekend was not the laziest weekend ever, but it did involve some work on my Lazy Weekend Canoe.  Although most of the weekend was dedicated to watching the kids as KaeLynn took Brooklyn to a dance competition, I did have a bit of time for boat building.  For one thing, I was able to edge join the plywood panels for the Lazy Weekend canoe that I am building.  I also got all of the marks made for where the seats go.  It turns out that there are some obvious problems with the plans.  The seat heights are switched for both the aft and forward seats.  The first version of the Lazy Weekend Canoe. Continue reading “Edge Joining Plywood”

Winter Camp: February 2016

We decided that a warm up winter camp was a good idea this year.  Not only would this allow us to get in another camp out during the winter time when things are normally pretty quiet, but it would also allow the boys a chance to test their gear and knowledge against a lower altitude location before heading off into the mountains.  The one public campground that stays open all winter long in the area is the Willow Park Campground.  This time of year there is always room, and it has a heated bathroom that they keep really warm. Continue reading “Winter Camp: February 2016”